Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Easy Sourdough Starter Recipe


Easy Sourdough Starter














Who else is a sourdough fanatic? The amazing, rich aroma of fresh baked sourdough bread. That crisp, crunchy crust, combined with that sweet, zesty taste. There really is nothing better than a delicious sourdough bowl filled with your favorite soup, or a stacked-high sandwich made with a sourdough loaf.

If you're like me, you love sourdough but have never been able to "master" the art of the sourdough starter. Believe me, it definitely is an art! I've tried and tried again with different recipes here in the Honeyville Kitchen, to no avail. I've created, proofed, fed, bubbled, and brewed so many unsuccessful starters that I was ready to turn my back on sourdough all together!

The turmoil is over. It's time for a simple, easy-to-create recipe that gives you all the excitement of brewing your own starter, without all the stress. It's time to get excited about baking sourdough bread, and we've got just the two recipes to do it! First, we're going to show you how to make your starter, then we've got a delicious Sourdough baguette recipe we know you"ll love! Let's get to making our own sourdough starter!

Sourdough Starter

Sourdough Starter











Ingredients:
2 cups Honeyville Alta Artisan Bread Flour
1 Tbsp SAF Yeast
2 cups Warm Water

Directions:
In a half gallong to gallon size container, combine water, flour, and yeast, then stir together.

Sourdough Starter Ingredients











You want to make sure that you use a quart size jar or container, as your starter will expand and deflate during the proofing process.

Starter Texture











Cover the lid of your starter with a clean dish towel and place in a warm spot in your kitchen for 2-5 days. Stir your starter once each day. You'll know the starter is still proofing if it continues to bubble after each stir and throughout each day. The consistency of your starter will change from a thick, chunky batter-like texture to a thin, almost runny batter on the last day, similar to a thin pancake batter. You'll also know things are going well when your starter has that amazing, sour smell that just grows stronger each day.

On the fifth and final day, give it one last stir, place a lid on it, then store in the refrigerator until ready to use. Remember, each day you should replace equal parts starter and flour/water mix. This feeds the starter and keeps it alive and active.

Starter in a Cup











Now your starter is ready for use!

Wheat Sourdough Baguettes

Wheat Sourdough Baguettes











Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups Warm Water
1 cup Sourdough Starter
2 Tbsp Sugar
1 Tbsp Salt
1 cup Honeyville Hard White Wheat, milled
4 cups Honeyville Alta Artisan Bread Flour
3 Tbsp SAF Yeast

Directions:
Add ingredients to your BOSCH Universal Mixer in the following order:
Water, starter, sugar, salt, milled hard white wheat, 1 cup alta artisan flour, and yeast. Turn mixer to #2 starter and let ingredients mix. While mixer is still running, add remaining flour until dough begins to pull away from the sides. Knead in machine for 2-3 more minutes.

Bread Dough











Remove from mixer and place on a lightly oiled surface.

Baguettes











Divide dough in half and shape each ball into a baguette shape, removing any excess air, then place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Sliced Baguettes











Right before placing baguettes in oven, slice the tops and spray with water.

Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove and allow to cool on a wire rack. Slice and serve.

Baked Baguettes











These baguettes are full of all the delicious sourdough flavor you've come to love. The sweet aroma of fresh baked sourdough bread will fill your home and kitchen. By far the best thing about this bread is that it's made with your very own starter! Now who can beat that?!

It's time to love sourdough again, and with this simple, easy starter recipe, you can have fresh baked sourdough bread that you're whole family will love!

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why bother to cheat by adding 3T of commercial yeast if there is no time allowed for the bread to rise?

In The Kitchen With Honeyville said...

Good point. You actually do want to give the bread about 20-30 minutes to rise a bit before you place it in the oven. What I do is finish up shaping my loafs, then I turn the oven on. By the time the oven is at full temperature, my loafs have risen enough.

Anonymous said...

I have the starter ready to use today. Smells wonderful. A comment and a question.

1. A quart jar wasn't large enough and it rose all over my counter-a half gallon pickle jar works better. Day 2 I move to quart size. It was fine then.

2. Do I add more flour/mix only when I use starter or everyday as stated. How long can you go between uses when it's refrigerated?

Thank you so much. Anne

In The Kitchen With Honeyville said...

Great comment and suggestions! I would recommend, once you are past the 5 day time, to remove some of the starter and add more flour and water each day. This helps to keep the starter alive and active. If you don't use it each day, I'd recommend take a cup of starter out each day and replacing it with 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup water. Once you make that replacement, let it sit out for 6-8 hours, then refrigerate again.

Anonymous said...

Don't you have to be careful NOT to stir the starter with a metal spoon?

Thanks,
Sue

In The Kitchen With Honeyville said...

We stirred our starter with a wooden spoon, and only stirred it once each day.