Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Marble Rye Bread Recipe
















Isn't Marble Rye Bread awesome? There's something about those two distinct colors, swirled together to make a beautiful slice of bread heaven, that always transports me to an old town New York Deli. Whether sliced up and served by itself or grilled up with corned beef and cabbage, I think we can all agree that marble rye is a bread we just can't help but love.

While we all love marble rye, do any of us really ever think about making it ourselves? We always associate aroma-filled bakeries and sandwich shops with delicious marble rye, but what if we could make that same bread in our own kitchen? Think of the excitement our family would feel when they rush in to the kitchen to see a loaf of that dark and light beauty cooling on the counter! Well today we're going to show you how from a simple bread recipe you can make two delicious loafs of Marble Rye!

Ingredients:
(Light Dough)
2 cups Honeyville Alta Artisan Flour
1 cup Honeyville Whole Grain Rye (Milled)
3 tsp Honeyville Dough Conditioner
2 1/4 tsp Dry Active Yeast
1 1/4 tsp Salt
1 tsp Sugar
1 1/4 cup Warm Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil

(Dark Dough)
2 cups Honeyville Alta Artisan Flour
1 cup Honeyville Whole Grain Rye (Milled)
2 Tbsp Honeyville Baker's Cocoa Powder
3 tsp Honeyville Dough Conditioner
2 1/4 tsp Dry Active Yeast
1 1/4 tsp Salt
1 tsp Sugar
1 1/4 cup Warm Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil

Yields: 2 loafs

Directions:
Mill 2 cups of whole grain rye in your grain mill to get 1 cup of rye flour for each dough.

Activate yeast by adding yeast, sugar, and 1/4 cup water in a small bowl. Remember, you are making to separate dough balls, so you'll need to activate each yeast separate for each dough.


In two separate mixing bowls, combine dry ingredients in each bowl, keeping each separate from the other.

Combine activated yeast, olive oil, and an additional cup of water to each mix. Mix each together in their separate bowls until soft dough begins to form. The dark dough will have a darker appearance, thanks to the cocoa powder.


On a floured surface, knead out one of the balls of dough until dough is soft and smooth.


Repeat this step for the other ball of dough.

Place both balls in their own greased bowls, cover, and let rise for 1 hour.


Once dough's have doubled in size, remove from bowl and place on a floured surface. With a dough scraper, cut the light ball in half.


Repeat this step for the dark ball as well.


Take one of each halved dough balls and push out on a floured surface until all are bubbles have been pushed out of the dough.


Place the dark dough on top of the light dough, and line up each edge as best as possible.


Roll dough, lightly pinching as you go, and shape dough into a loaf.


Place in a greased bread loaf pan, and cover.


Repeat process for the other loaf.


For our second loaf, I reversed the order of the colors, having the darker dough on the outside of the loaf.

Cover both loafs and let rise for 1 hour.


Uncover, bang on counter, and let rise an additional 45 minutes to an hour.

While loaves are rising, preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Spritz top of loaves lightly with water.

Place risen loaves in the oven and bake for 5 minutes at 400 degrees, then decrees temperature to 350 degrees and cook for an additional 25 minutes.

Remove and let cool on a wire rack.


Slice up and serve.

This bread cooks up amazingly fluffy and light, with a colorful swirl that can't be beat! Remember, the tighter you roll the dough, the bigger the swirl!


The aroma of the bread baking is divine! The cocoa powder gives just a hint of sweets baking, while the sweet smell of baking bread fills your whole home.


The best part of this recipe is the fact that it yields two loaves, so you can just to have a light on dark...


...and a dark on light loaf. Whichever way you create your loaves, one thing is for sure. Once you make this recipe, you'll want to do it again and again! Enjoy!

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