Friday, June 7, 2013

Food Storage Friday #39: Campfire Bread in a Bag Recipe
















I've got bread on the brain! And why not? After our great guest post by the very popular Chef Brad on how to make Challah Bread, then his wonderful "Bread Baking" class he taught at our Rancho Cucamonga, CA store, all I seem to be thinking about is how I can incorporate more bread recipes in my cooking and Food Storage plans.

One recipe, in particular, that Chef Brad featured seemed perfect for our Food Storage Friday posts. We've already featured two great Tin Foil Meals in a Bag that you can take on your camping and hiking trips this summer. But what about a Bread in a Bag recipe that you can prepare at your campsite, then bake in a Dutch Oven? Sounds complicated? Don't worry, thanks to Chef Brad's amazing Bread in a Bag recipe, we've got you covered! Once you see how easy this recipe is, you'll wonder how you ever went camping without fresh baked bread again!

Ingredients (in Bag):
2 cups Honeyville All Purpose Flour
1 cup Honeyville Hard White Wheat (Milled)
3 tsp Honeyville Dough Conditioner
2 Tbsp Sugar
2 tsp Salt
2 Tbsp Dry Active Yeast
1 Gallon sized resealable Freezer Bag

Ingredients (at Campsite):
1 cup Hot Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil (optional)

Directions:
Prepare your Bread in a Bag buy filling a 1 gallon resealable Freezer Bag with your flour, milled wheat, sugar, salt, and yeast.


Mill your Hard White Wheat.


You'll notice that I used 2 cups regular flour and 1 cup milled Hard White Wheat. In his class, Chef Brad suggested that with every bread recipe, your flour should consist of 2/3 regular white flour and 1/3 any grain of your choice.


I chose Hard White Wheat for our recipe, but you could substitute any grain you'd like.


I also decided to use our Honeyville Dough Conditioner. Dough Conditioner is like a  healthy boost to your dough and loaf. It makes your loafs fluffier, your dough smoother, and just gives your bread and dough a healthier look. Think of what conditioner does to your hair. That's what dough conditioner does to bread.


Once ingredients are safely sealed in your bag, you are ready to head to camp.


At camp, heat up 1 cup of water to about 100 degrees. Pour water and oil (if you choose to use oil) into the bag, seal the top, and begin to knead bread.


This is a fun way to get your kids to help out with the meal around the campfire.


All you have to do is squish, squeeze, punch, and push the ingredients all together in the bag.


Check the seal on the bag to make sure nothing is coming out.

Once ingredients are completely combined, set bag aside and let dough rise until it is doubled in bag (this took a little less than an hour for me).


While dough is rising, prepare your Dutch Oven by spraying the inside with cooking spray.


Once dough has risen, remove from bag, shape in a ball, and place in your Dutch Oven.


Cover, and let rise until dough has filled the entire oven.


I placed our Dutch Oven in a sunny spot. This allowed for the dough to rise even quicker.


Once dough has completely raised, heat up your coals and place them on and under the Dutch Oven. We'll be cooking at a 350 degree temperature, so if you're using a 10" Dutch Oven, like us, you'll need 14 coals on top, 7 coals on bottom.

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes, rotating the Dutch Oven lid and Dutch Oven itself at the 10 to 12 minute mark.


Remove coals and bread loaf if you desire from the Dutch Oven. Serve with butter and honey.


The bread has a pie or quiche look to it, but is super flavorful, and the Hard White Wheat packs it with plenty of whole grain goodness.


And the aroma is simple amazing. Imagine having a camp site that smells like  your local bread shop!


So next time you go camping, leave the processed hot dogs and toaster pastries at home, prepare some bread in a bag, and have a true feast in the wild!

5 comments:

lfhpueblo said...

Looks yummy. Often had bread that looked like that growing up, it was my mom's fry bread. It's wasn't corn bread, it was regular bread but she cooked it by cooking on top the stove in a deep cast iron skillet with the lid on top. I do think she flipped it a couple times during the cooking process though. I don't have the recipe, she's passed away. Wish I had it.

Me said...

Great recipe! I'm wondering if I could make several of these and then store them? I do lots of meals in jars (Love Chef Tess!) and wondering how I could do this right in the ziplock bag so that we have it to mix in. Any idea how long the shelf-life would be?

Cookin' Cousins said...

As we said in the post, this is NOT a shelf stable recipe, and we don't recommend storing this as such. Because the ziploc seal is not an air-tight seal, we don't recommend trying to use this as a Meal in a Jar recipe, unless you transfer the ingredients from the bag to an air-tight mason jar with an oxygen absorber.

Anonymous said...

do you have to use dough conditioner? What does it do? what is it made of? I try to stay basic.


Cookin' Cousins said...

You don't have to use dough conditioner, but it will definitely improve your overall loaf. Think of it the same way you use conditioner for your hair. You don't need it, but it definitely improves your dough.