Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Teacher Tuesday: Homemade Yogurt with Stephanie Young















Welcome to the May edition of our Teacher Tuesday posts, where we feature the amazing and knowledgeable instructors that teach at our four Honeyville Farms Retail store locations. Today we're pleased to have as our guest Stephanie Young, instructor at our Rancho Cucamonga, CA store. Stephanie is a Southern California native who lives by the motto "Love what you cook and cook what you love." Stephanie specializes in recipes focused on whole and natural foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Today, Stephanie will show us how we can use a few simple, whole food items from Honeyville to make a delicious homemade yogurt recipe.

Stephanie Young


Hello to all the Honeyville fans, my name is Stephanie Young. I teach at the Honeyville store in Rancho Cucamonga, CA. I grew up in San Bernardino, CA and love sunny mornings and bright days. I watched my mother cook and bake as I grew up. I have a fondness for making and teaching baked bread class, as well as sweet snacks. I've learned to be very resourceful and use easy-to-find foods that are healthy as well. I have discovered over time that the body needs whole foods. Start with simple foods and introduce them to your cooking and baking. Grains are a great place to start, as well as vegetables and fruit.

My four children and husband have been the goodness for my continued progress in the kitchen. Honeyville Farms has been a fun outlet for me to teach some of those recipes, but also learn from all of you. I hope you will come by for some of my classes, and we can learn together new ways to incorporate whole foods into our everyday lives.

For the month of May we're focusing on Women's Health at Honeyville. To go right along with that, I've picked a recipe that has definitely improved my own personal health. I hope you enjoy this delicious recipe, that is very simple to make right at home.

Homemade Yogurt


Ingredients:
1 gallon reconstituted Honeyville Nonfat Dry Milk
1 cup Yogurt (that contains live active cultures and no gelatin)

Equipment you'll need:
2 Large Pots
1 Food Thermometer
4 One-Quart Canning Jars
Heating Pad

Directions:
In a large pot, heat milk over medium high to 180 degrees. Make sure to keep the heat at 180 degrees. This temperature will help pasteurize the milk, but anything warmer will change the flavor.


Let the milk cool to 115 degrees. This should take 1-2 hours, depending on the temperature of your kitchen.

Once cool, add yogurt and mix completely.

Pour mixture into 4 sterilized canning jars.

Partially fill second pot with water that is 115 degrees. Typically the water from your tap, turned on hot, should be this temperature. Make sure to use your food thermometer to check for sure.

Place the jars of yogurt in the hot water bath. Cover the pot with the lid.

Place water and yogurt filled pot on a heating pad for 5-8 hours. Adjust the heat of the pad to maintain 115 degrees water temperature for the 5-8 hours. You'll want to make sure you're checking regularly with the food thermometer. Remember, the longer you let it sit, the tarter the flavor will get.


Once ready, let mason jars cool in the refrigerator 8-12 hours before serving. Serve in a bowl with granola, freeze dried fruit, or just by itself.

If you're interested in finding more recipes focused on whole foods, come check out my class at the Honeyville Farms retail store location in Rancho Cucamonga, CA during May:

Saturday, May 11 - 2 p.m. - Honeyville & Health

2 comments:

Traci Best said...

So, at this point if we wanted greek style yogurt we could strain this and expect about two quarts of product?

(Doing the math to see if it is cost effective for me to make my own, or if I should just keep purchasing it from the store. )

Denise Turner said...

Stephanie,

Love your yogurt recipe! It was so easy and inexpensive. But I ran into a little problem, with my heating pad; it shut off ever hour.
The pharmacist informed me that, they all do this for safety reasons. I explained that it wasn’t for aching muscles, it was for making yogurt. He gave me a strange look and walked away mumbling. Abandoned by the anti-yogurt pharmacist, I was more determined to find a heating pad that wouldn’t turn off. Yipee! I did. The “Xpress Heat” by Sunbeam has 6 settings and a “stay on” switch.