Thursday, March 7, 2013

Powdered vs. Fresh: The Differences Between Honeyville Eggs and Farm Fresh Eggs






















Have you ever wondered how whole powdered egg products line up compared to farm-fresh eggs? I taught an egg class this week at our Honeyville store in Chandler where we talked specifically about the different kinds of egg products we carry at our Honeyville stores and how to use them compared to a regular egg. I thought I'd share that here on the Cookin' Cousins blog!  Honeyville carries several different shelf-stable whole egg products. I use them all for very different applications. 

Whole egg powder looks like this. 

Freeze Dried Scrambled Eggs look like this. 

Ova-Easy Egg Crystals look like this. 

Here's how they compare to regular eggs.

Farm Fresh Eggs
Honeyville Powdered Whole Eggs
Honeyville Freeze Dried
Scrambled Eggs
Honeyville Ova Easy Egg Crystals
Cost (prices vary per store location)
$3.19 for 12 eggs.
27 cents an egg.
$19.69 *80 eggs.
25 cents an egg.
$31.39    * 16 ½ cup
servings (about 32 eggs). 98 cents an egg.
$29.99 *96 eggs.
31 cents an egg.
Ingredients
Fresh egg
Pasteurized whole egg with less than 2% sodium silico aluminate added as an anti-caking agent.
Freeze-dried cooked
scrambled eggs (liquid
whole eggs, non-fat milk, soybean oil, modified food starch, salt, xanthan gum,
citric acid, butter flavor maltodextrin, natural butter flavor, annatto, and
turmeric (for color),
pepper).
Whole Eggs, Egg Yolk,
Dried Egg Whites (Glucose
removed for stability).
Appearance
Open
Farm fresh less than 3 days from the chicken to the comparison.
Very light yellow powder almost like a flour in texture.
Appear like a dry
scrambled egg.
Light yellow crystals.
Almost look like a fluffy yellow sugar.
Smell
So fresh they smelled like the chicken. Cracked open they
were very mild.
Distinct egg smell,
initially a bit strong.
Mild egg smell with hints
of seasoning.
Distinct egg smell, but
mild.
Ease of Use
Baking Conversions

Need to remove shell, but ready to use. No need to measure or hydrate.
Can be used dry or hydrated. No need to remove shell.
Easy to measure.
2T+1/4 cup
water = 1 egg
N/A
2T+¼ cup water =1 egg.
(Only a problem if it called for egg whites or yolks as this is a whole egg product.)
Baking Cake Rating
5 being highest
5 5 Exceptionally fine texture and volume N/A 3
Cookies 5 5 N/A 5
Baked Quiche and Custards
5 5 N/A 5
Scrambled
Appearance Creamy light yellow. No
water separation.
Whitish yellow with a little water separation after cooking. Had to drain off the liquid.
When drained of extra boiling water to hydrate, fluffy with creamy appearance. Must follow package instructions
for good results.
Light yellow. Slightly creamy with a very small amount of water separation.
Omelettes
Creamy, nice texture, mild.
Grainy, mushy texture, bland flat flavor. Not much like an egg. Very different than the scrambled application.
N/A
Creamy, nice texture, mild flavor, good egg taste.
Shelf Stable No 3 years 10-15 years 5 years

I prefer the whole egg powder in my cake most of all. When comparing them using the egg powder in the Honeyville yellow cake mix, there was a very dramatic difference in the volume of my cake as well as the texture over-all. 


Look at the difference in volume!

 Summary

  • In general I use the whole egg powder for all my baking recipes when they call for eggs. The products all turn out perfectly. 
  •  I reserve my Ova-Easy eggs for omlets, scrambled eggs, quiche and custards that I want to have a "fresh egg" flavor. 
  • Freeze-dried scrambled eggs I use in fried rice, egg-burritos and skillet meals when I want cooked egg without having to use a separate pan.

Always My Very Best,
Your Friend Chef Tess

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I was told that once you open a can of powdered eggs you can't leave it on the shelf, that you need to freeze/refrigerate. Is that true?

Cookin' Cousins said...

That's correct. Because they are actual eggs, once the airtight seal is broken and they are exposed to air, they need to be treated the same as fresh eggs.

Anonymous said...

Does that hold true for vacuum sealing them after the can is opened?

Cookin' Cousins said...

If you vacuum seal them immediately after you open them, they should keep the same shelf life as if they were still sealed in the can.

erin and isaac said...

I left mine out on the shelf for a year while i used it up!! I didn't die or get sick. I used them for baking. I would read the can, it's been a few years. I am trying to find the whole egg powder by Honeyville It's my favorite. Also, if something needs to be refrigerated, it often needs it before opening (like yogurt and milk). I think once it's dry, it is not like a whole product. It will go rancid if you don't use it up because of the oxygen, but I think it's ok.