Friday, February 15, 2013

Food Storage Friday #25: Which Potatoes are Best For Me?
















Flakes. Dices. Slices. No, those aren't the words used to describe the functions of the latest food processor  Those are the different types of potatoes we carry here at Honeyville and, at first look, those terms can be a bit intimidating. Many of you may be wondering which one's should you have in your own food storage pantry. Do you need all of them? Does one store better or longer than another? And really, what exactly is a flake?

Today we're going to put your fears to rest and discuss the different potato options we offer for your personal pantry, a brief explanation of each, and the best ways to use them. We've also included a delicious recipe at the bottom using one of our potato products. So, let's talk 'taters!


Instant Potato Flakes


Now, if any of you are like me, you've probably asked yourself: "What exactly is a flake, and how do I use it?" In a nutshell, Honeyville Instant Potato Flakes are cooked mashed potatoes that have been dried on a roller, then ground into a flaky texture. What do I need them for you ask? Mashed potatoes of course. Just add boiling water, whisk  and within minutes you have light, fluffy mashed potatoes ready to serve. You can also use them in soups, casseroles, pot pies, and as shown below, even bread making. And with a shelf life of 10 to 15 years in a sealed can, these mashed potatoes are the perfect addition to any food storage plan.

Dehydrated Potato Dices


Looking for a product with a bit more potato included? Then you should check out our Honeyville Dehydrated Potato Dices. These small, cube-shaped potato pieces have been skinned, diced, and dehydrated for your cooking pleasures. Use them in any recipe calling for potatoes, like casseroles, breakfast burritos, and stews. Keep in mind the shelf life of 5 to 10 years, sealed in a #10 can, is just a bit shorter than the flakes.

Dehydrated Potato Slices


The name speaks for itself. Our Honeyville Dehydrated Potato Slices are just that, sliced  and skinned segments of potato. The texture and look is very similar to a potato chip, but these are actually potatoes ready to be rehydrated and cooked with. Because these are whole potato slices, the options for cooking are far greater than the first too, but some popular ways to use them would be scalloped potatoes, cheesy potatoes, included in soups or stews, or even just mashing them up. Just as with the dices, our potato slices hold a shelf life of 5 to 10 years sealed in a #10 can.

Other Potato Options


In addition to our three potato products, we also offer Honeyville Dehydrated Hash Brown Potatoes and Honeyville Freeze Dried Sweet Potatoes. These are also great, shelf sustaining items that can be used in any recipes calling for them. While we didn't discuss them directly, they are worth keeping in mind when preparing your potato section in your food storage pantry.

Now that you know a little bit more about our potatoes, check out this delicious recipe using our Potato Flakes!

Potato Parmesan Biscuits


Ingredients:
3 cups Honeyville All Purpose Flour
1 1/3 cup Honeyville Instant Potato Flakes
1/2 cup grated Parmesan Cheese
2 Tbsp Baking Powder
2 Tbsp Sugar
2 tsp Salt
2 sticks butter, cut into small cubes
1 cup Honeyville Buttermilk Powder
1/2 cup cold water
1 Egg

Directions:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix flour, potato flakes, Parmesan cheese, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a bowl.
Add butter and mix with hands or fork until mixture has a crumb-like texture.
Reconstitute Buttermilk powder according to instructions on the can, and stir together with water and egg in a smaller bowl.
Add to dry ingredients and mix with a fork until dough is moist and soft. Don't worry if the dough isn't smooth, it should be a bit lumpy.
Place dough on a floured surface, such as a counter top or cutting board, and knead dough 3-4 times. After dough has been kneaded, roll out to a 3/4 inch thickness.
Take a Mason Jar screw-top lid or circled cookie cutter and cut biscuits out of the dough. You may need to ball up the dough and roll it out again a few times to get as many biscuits as you can.
Place biscuits on a lightly greased or parchment lined baking sheet.
Bake in the oven for 15-30 minutes, or until golden brown. Make sure to watch carefully as these biscuits can burn pretty easily. Remove and let cool 5-10 minutes before serving.


6 comments:

Anonymous said...

How many biscuits does this recipe make?

Cookin' Cousins said...

The recipe should make 12-14 biscuits. Thanks for the question!

Road To Forever said...

I received a can of the potato slices in the vegetable variety case. Any chance of getting a recipe in a jar for scalloped potatoes?

Cookin' Cousins said...

Thats a great sugggestion! We'll talk with Chef Tess and see if we can find a delicious recipe!

Knick said...

Chef Tess does have a recipe for scalloped potatoes :)

http://cheftessbakeresse.blogspot.com/2012/04/scalloped-potatoes-and-ham-au-gratin.html

LOOOOOVE her recipes

Anonymous said...

Woo Hoo! Thanks for this post! I was a little confused with all of the different forms of the beautiful potato. I have been using the diced potatoes in soups but was not sure how to use the other forms. Will branch out and try new recipes. Thanks!